Tag Archives: low carb

With Great Freedom Comes Great Responsibility: The Safety of Sugar Free

I like to think that I eat fairly healthily, especially compared to the norm. I try to keep my carbohydrates low, eat plenty of vegetables, and always have a bottle of water handy.

There is one questionable substance I allow myself without restriction, however: sucralose. I’ve realized this lately, and am attempting to cut down, but it’s made me curious about just how dangerous fake sweeteners are.

Most Americans and Europeans regularly consume “fake” sweeteners on a regular basis, either on purpose (in baking, coffee and tea) or unintentionally (in reduced fat foods, and even some medications). They’re a welcomed loophole for those looking to lose or maintain their weight, and keep their blood sugar stable. But are they safe?

It Causes Cancer! … It Might Cause Cancer! … Male Lab Rats Are Prone to Cancer!

It seems that the best argument those who oppose sweeteners have is that aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose are all carcinogenic–they cause cancer. But do they really?

The newest study to come to light was in June of 2013, when Italian scientist Dr. Morando Soffritti fed male lab rats “varying” levels of sucralose throughout their lives. This study is still under peer review, and has caused quite a bit of controversy in the scientific community.(1) It contradicts the 2000 study which concluded that the substance posed no threat. Both studies were carried out on lab rats over a significant portion of their life span.

The scientific community, so far, is disregarding this study as “bad science,” however. Read the full story here. It seems that this Dr. Soffritti has been under review by his peers for less than perfect performance in the past, so for now, the consensus is that sucralose is safe for consumption.

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This is only the most recent of many almost identical situations for artificial sweeteners. In the 1970s, the oldest sweetener, saccharin, came under fire when scientists found that lab rats fed the substance developed bladder tumors. Upon further investigation, it was discovered that the specific way rodents metabolized saccharin was causing the problem, and that humans would not suffer the same consequences. Warning labels were removed from Sweet’n’Low and Sugar Twin by 2000.

Conversely to the accusatory studies, University of Adelaide researchers released findings that shows that the gut’s reaction to sweetener is neutral. “In our most recent study involving healthy men, we found that the gut’s response to artificially sweetened drinks was neutral – it was no different to drinking a glass of water,” the researcher added. (2)

What About Natural No-Calorie or Low-Calorie Sweeteners?

When you think of “natural low calorie sweetener,” how many of you think of Stevia? Oh, looks like most of you.

Unfortunately, it looks like Stevia is actually worse for you than any chemical sweetener–though nobody is going to drop from this chemical. The compounds in this shrub, which has been consumed for centuries, break down in humans’ guts to steviol, which is slightly toxic. Dr. Berger explains this much better than I could:

Erythritol, however, seems to be the one golden angel of the bunch. This chemical has never been accused of being harmful–in fact, it’s only fault is being a sugar alcohol. No, it doesn’t get you drunk; being a sugar alcohol means that a fair amount of the population (about 40%) will get a blood sugar spike from consuming it, though smaller than if they were consuming regular sugar. Also, all sugar alcohols (xylitol, maltitol, and sorbitol are some of the more common ones) cause many consumers intestinal discomfort, so make sure you keep track of how much you eat in one serving, and per day, or you may be in for a bad time.

stevia

 

So What Am I To Nom?

Because artificial sweeteners are still under review, it’s hard to say what the future brings. However, at this time, it looks like all commercially available low or no calorie sweeteners are safe for consumption–in moderation. Keep track of how much you eat a day, and take note of any weird symptoms or discomfort. Your body will tell you what’s best!

 

What sweetener do you use?

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Curry Chicken without the Coconut

Hello all! Welcome to my very first recipe blog.

I’m going to show you how to cook one my very favorite weeknight dinners. It’s super easy and super keto. Also it’s a curry with NO COCONUT in it! Hurray! One of my biggest trials with keto is that a lot of my favorite resources have started talking about how wonderful coconut is for you, and how helpful it is with LCHF diets…but alas, I am terribly allergic.

Without further ado, here is Chicken Curry, as performed by the newest Gatesman.

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Get out a nice big frying pan. I used stainless steel but there’s no reason not to use whichever one you want–just keep in mind that this recipe serves either 2 very hungry people or 3 normal people.

Add about 2 tablespoons of some kind of fat, I used olive oil because that’s what I had. Turn the pan to low to warm up.

While the pan is warming up, cut one of those big white onions in half. Put away one half, and dice the other half, like so:

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The oil should be hot now, so put those suckers in the pan. Add a cup of water right after you put them in…

….I know I know But Becca! this doesn’t let them caramelize. Keep in mind that this is my go-to week night dinner for when I want to be not-cooking ASAP. If you have the time to let them, then please, caramelize your onions. But it you don’t and you’re just going to burn them and call them caramelized, put the water in so you have tender onions, not burnt cracklings.

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Stir that sucker around. This is a good time to also add a heaping tablespoon of diced garlic or garlic in olive oil (what I used)

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Next up, get out two chicken boobs, or about 20 oz worth, raw. For you on the East coast, I used two of those massive ones from Wegmans.

Cut them up into pieces equal to or smaller than the size of your thumb. Put them in the pan with the onions and garlic.

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You can turn the heat up a little bit at this point, to low-medium. Or y’know, whatever you feel is appropriate–gas ranges are like that.

This is how high mine was, though:

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Alright, here comes the fun part!

I usually do a base layer of Badia Curry Powder. This is a pretty standard, American palate friendly curry powder, and it’s about $1.50 for 6 months worth.

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After the base layer is applied, it’s time for The Expensive Curry. These are my pistols in my own personal cooking Western.

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I usually apply 2-3 of the 5 options, depending how I feel and what smells like dinner to me that night. For this particular meal I used Tandoori, Balti, and a little bit of Maharajah.

This is also when you should apply your spice–I used about 2 teaspoons of Huy Fong Foods’ (that’s the company that makes Sriracha) Chili Garlic Sauce. Think strong thoughts. 

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Stir that bad boy up. Add another cup of water.

At this point, if you want to have a low fat meal, continue to simmer until done. It’ll look something like this

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However, those on the keto goodness track, add yer dollop of sour cream now. Or I guess your coconut oil if you’re reading this post for no good reason.

Yes, I’m using sour cream as a replacement for coconut. No, I’m not ashamed or sorry.

Yes, I’m using a cow product in Indian food. Deal with it. I’m just sacrilegious like that. If you can’t handle the heat, get out of the kitchen. And so on…

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Stir that bad boy up, simmer for a few more seconds until it’s pleasingly combined, and you’re done!

I served mine over cauliflower in various forms. My husband eats his over rice. We both win.

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2 tbsp olive oil
2 cups of water
2 chicken breasts
2 tbsp sour cream
generous curry powder
generous garlic
half a white onion
1 tbsp chili garlic sauce
1 tsp kosher salt

1. Add 2 tbsp oil to a pan. Turn flame on low
2. As the pan is warming up, chop up the onion
3. Add the onion to the pan. Add 1 cup of water and stir
4. Add diced up garlic, or garlic in olive oil (what I used, I’m lazy). Stir
5. Cut the chicken into pieces the same size as, or smaller, than your thumb
6. Add chicken to pan. Stir
7. Allow chicken to cook until halfway through, or about a minute.
8. Add curry powder, the second cup of water, and chili garlic sauce to pan. Stir
9. Add the sour cream (this is used in place of coconut milk, I find it’s a perfect replacement!). Stir
10. Check one of the bigger pieces of chicken for doneness, but it should be all set.

Serve over “rice’d” cauliflower, mashed cauliflower, or regular rice. If you put in as much chilli as I direct, you may want to put an extra dollop of sour cream on top 😉

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For the whole recipe: 

980 calories, 16 g total carbohydrates, 3 g fiber (13 g net carbs), 119 g protein, 43 g fat

For 1/3 (one serving)

327 calories, 5 g total carbohydrates, 1 g fiber (4 g net carbs), 40 g protein, 14 g fat

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