Tag Archives: gains

Do Detox “Cleanse” Diets Work?

If you rounded up a group of people who had 10-20 pounds they were trying to lose, “do you wish you could lose it in a week? How about less than a month?” I guarantee you every one of them would answer yes.

This is the offering made by every detox cleanse diet. These “fad” “crash” diets have been made popular by celebrities, who face considerably pressure to make their body fit the director’s description of various characters. Beyonce made the “Lemonade Cleanse” famous when she lost 20 lbs in preparation for Dreamgirls. After shooting was over, however, she regained the weight rather quickly (Yahoo)–in general, we only see the dramatic losses, not the eventual regains in weight.

Are cleanse diets really worth it? Do they really “detoxify” your body? 

This is a rather broad question, so I’ll break it down into several points:

What is a detox diet?

It seems that almost every “detox” diet has a different definitely of what it truly means to “cleanse.” As a general rule, diets that claim you cannot properly cleanse your cells without their specially formulated product are probably not worth your while. Common sense dictates that if it’s something we need to do, then what we need to do it must occur naturally, not require a laboratory for manufacture.

Further, diets that claim you need a specific (naturally occurring) substance, such as apples, kale, or their great grandmother Hagatha’s tears of true joy, are also eliminated as bunk. Humans live throughout the world, and so far there have been few  deaths that resulted from a person dissolving into a “bag of puss.” (thanks for that visual, Raw Reform)

Essentially, if you’re looking for a diet that will “cleanse” your system, pick one that is either a water fast, or requires only a variety of produce to do.

As far as not for profit detox diets, their definition of the word seems to be:

  1. Resting of internal organs, especially the kidneys and liver
  2. Eliminating harmful foods from the diet
  3. Hydration
  4. Encouragement of toxin expulsion through the intestines, kidneys, lungs, and skin
  5. Improved blood circulation

The Benefits

The benefits of a diet such as a water fast, a juice fast, or eating only raw produce for a period of time are very similar (or identical, in the case of water fasting) to that of any kind of fasting.

As I mentioned in a previous article, fasting induces some physical reactions similar to those that exercise creates, as well as many others. The scholarly literature goes back into the 19th century, but in the two most sought after are usually:

  1. Rapid weight loss (though maintaining this loss requires a considerable change in lifestyle once the fast is broken)
  2. Increased insulin sensitivity (again, lifestyle must be maintained after fast to keep this benefit)

These benefits will also be seen in a “detox” diet, as they almost unanimously lower calories into the realm of a “partial fast” (under 600 kcal a day).

Detox diets also remove junk food, psychologically reactive chemicals (such as alcohol and caffeine), and most–if not all–of the more difficult to digest foods, such as fibrous produce, meat, and fat. Perhaps the most logical reason that dieters feel “clean” during and after “detoxing” is that by removing most or all of their food sources, they also eliminate possible allergens, or foods that they are sensitive to, such as wheat, soy, lactose, eggs, and peanuts (as well as many more uncommon sources of irritation).

If you’re experimenting with detoxing and feel less enflamed (not to be confused with bloated, which is caused by excessive sugar or salt, but not an usually by an allergy) than you did previously, they would be wise to experiment with removing single ingredients from their diet to expedite the process of finding what food is causing discomfort. 
 

The Risks

As with fasting, low calorie diets or diets intended to put you in a state of ketosis (cleanse diets can be both or either) have the potential to upset your electrolyte balance, which can cause cramping, irritability, and lethargy. Seniors, children, adolescents, and women who are pregnant or nursing should definitely not attempt these, and others should keep in mind that if they experience these symptoms they should address them (a sports drink and a more varied diet usually does the trick!)

Reducing your calories should be approached cautiously, especially when under 800 calories. Your blood sugar will most likely drop drastically, which, depending on your current health, could lead to extreme fatigue, dizziness, and possible faintness. If you begin this diet, start on a Friday night, for a weekend that is free of plans, especially those that require cognitive skills and driving.

Also, expect to spend a considerable amount of time in the restroom, as many “cleanse” diets are made up primarily of laxatives and diuretics.

The Myth

Overall, detox and cleanse diets can have a similar effect on your system as a prolonged fast, either traditional or modified (under 600 calories daily).

However, if you’re feeling “toxic,” there is absolutely no scientific proof that these regimens will have any effect. Your body already has a fantastic waste management system, in the form of your kidneys, liver, intestines, and cardiovascular system. 

 

Have you ever done a cleanse diet?

Do you know anyone who has completed one of these regimens?

Have you ever been tempted to try one?

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How Important is a Good Workout Playlist?

Need to go to the gym, but not feeling motivated? Feeling run down by the world? Craving that pre-workout supplement, or maybe having a moment where you considering purchasing some? Science says that you can get similar benefits from your ear buds as from your local GNC.

Music as a Supplement

Music, undeniably, affects our bodies production and regulation of hormones, cytokines, peptides, and signalling molecules for neurotransmitters. Our emotions, stress levels, and immune function are thus altered while we listen to those sweet beats (Gangrade). It stands to reason that the right tunes can give us a physiological boost, as well as a psychological one.

Techno music, specifically, has been found to cause a significant increase in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and a raise in emotional state. A 1998 study suggests that 30 minutes of fast techno music would out perform many pre-workout supplements, by boosting not only your heart rate and blood pressure, but also by increasing your endorphines, GH, and noripenephrine by about 50%.

Effect of 30 minutes of techno and classical music on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (data adapted from Gerra. 1998 by Suppversity)

Relative (to baseline) neurotransmitter, catecholamine and hormone response to 30 minutes of techno vs. 30 minutes of classical music (data adapted from Gerra. 1998 by Suppversity )

What if you don’t like techno? Don’t listen to it! Being subjected to music you don’t like can make you feel tired faster, and raise your perceived exertion without any actual increase in heart rate(Nakamura).

You’ll get similar benefits by listening to any music that syncs with your heartbeat. As you exert yourself further, you’ll get more bang for your [heart] pump by listening to music that matches the tempo of your body (Karageorghis).

Resources for the Perfect Playlist

I’m a huge fan of Steady130, a site that creates monthly original mixes and organizes them by beats per minute. They have a few different genres of songs, and I either stream them from my phone or download them (depending on how reliable the WiFi will be where I’m working out). 

If you want to look up the beats per minute of any song, check out songbpm or runningplaylist.

Closing Thoughts

Do you run to music?

What kind of music do you perform cardio to, vs. anaerobic (lifting)?

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Is The Post-Exercise Anabolic Window a Myth?

Referencing:

Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window?
Alan Albert Aragon and Brad Jon Schoenfeld

(published in January of 2013)

What is this about?

This study challenges the belief that a specific type or timing of a “recovery meal” is necessary to get the most bang for your buck after a workout.

The researchers approach this by reviewing existing literature on the effects of nutrient timing and reanalyzing the results.

Results

There are several reasons given for eating post workout meals. This study addresses each in its own section, so I will follow suite:

Glycogen repletion

The most common reason given for eating a “recovery meal” is to replace the glycogen lost during heavy exercise.

Glycogen is a type of sugar which our body produces from the food we eat. It is very useful in “explosive,” or short and intense movements, such as jumping, or lifting something heavy. Our muscles can store glycogen within themselves, and can quickly turn it into energy (in the form of ATP) extremely quickly in a process called glycolysis.

There is some evidence that glycogen is also a mediator in intracellular signaling, and has an effect on the rate at which muscles are catabolized (reabsorbed to fuel the body).

Previous research in the field has indicated that:

  • Glycogen has been shown to be a defining factor in protein breakdown, and in reducing catabolism of muscle protein
  • When carbohydrates are consumed immediately post exercise, muscle glycogen is replenished twice as effectively as when the athletes waited to eat for 2 hours.
  • Consuming protein and carbohydrates together enhances glycogen resynthesis, or the process of muscles “filling up” with fuel again.

Aragon and Schoenfield’s thoughts on the matter are that there is not a significant amount of evidence supporting the “anabolic threshold.” Studies have, in their minds, proven that there are very select cases where the timing of eating will affect importance, such as endurance events (long enough to deplete glycogen, generally over 2 hours in duration) that are less than 8 hours apart, or those who train the same muscles more than once a day.

However, there is no evidence that there is any urgency for refueling for the majority of athletes and casual exercisers. 

Protein breakdown

As mentioned in the previous section, muscle catabolism is directly affected by insulin levels, which are almost entirely controlled by ingested carbohydrates. One of the arguments for the importance of eating directly after exercise it to prevent muscle loss. However, science, at this time, does not fully understand the control insulin has on catabolism.

Aragon and Schoenfield point to several studies that prove spiking insulin directly after a resistance training workout has trivial benefits, if any, unless the athlete is in a fasted state prior to the workout beginning.

Protein Synthesis

This, by far, is the most touted reason to have a post-workout meal as soon as possible. However, Aragon and Schoenfield state that there is almost literally no reliable outcomes in studies that address how muscle protein synthesis is affected by post workout nutrient intake. Each study gets a different result, and, in their words:

Thus, the utility of acute studies is limited to providing clues and generating hypotheses regarding hypertrophic adaptations; any attempt to extrapolate findings from such data to changes in lean body mass is speculative, at best.

Muscle hypertrophy

At this point, honestly, you can feel the authors’ blood pressure rising. Throughout the article, they have presented the findings of various studies, and then addressed how the studies were, essentially, worthless, or at least overvalued.

This section is more of the same. The table presented after explaining that each study in the field had a completely different design is all that needs to be restated:

Post-exercise nutrition and muscle hypertrophy

Essentially, there was no conclusive evidence of significant muscle volume changes in between groups.

Their conclusion and advice for practical application

According to Aragon and Schoenfield’s article, there is no conclusive evidence that the anabolic window exists in any significant way except for those most extreme competitive athletes.

Their suggestion to the majority of the population is to instead focus on all around nutrition throughout the day and week. There is some evidence that the preworkout meal is more important, but the studies for that theory are no more thorough than those outlined in this paper.

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