Monthly Archives: December 2013

Chicken Soup Really Does Help

Looking for scientifically proven remedies to the common cold?

Try out this recipe:

• 1 5- to 6-lb stewing hen or baking chicken;
• 1 package of chicken wings;
• 3 large onions;
• 1 large sweet potato;
• 3 parsnips;
• 2 turnips;
• 11 to 12 large carrots;
• 5 to 6 celery stems;
• 1 bunch of parsley; and
• salt and pepper to taste.
Clean the chicken, put it in a large pot, and cover it with cold water. Bring the water to a boil. Add the chicken wings, onions, sweet potato, parsnips, turnips, and carrots. Boil about 1.5 h. Remove fat from the surface as it accumulates. Add the parsley and celery. Cook the mixture about 45 min longer. Remove the chicken. The chicken is not used further for the soup. (The meat makes excellent chicken parmesan.) Put the vegetables in a food processor until they are chopped fine or pass through a strainer. Both were performed in the present study. Salt and pepper to taste. (Note: this soup freezes well.) Matzoh balls were prepared according to the recipe on the back of the box of matzoh meal (Manischewitz; Jersey City, NJ).

Presented in Chicken Soup Inhibits Neutrophil Chemotaxis In Vitro* by Rennard, et. al., this specific recipe was used to prove that chicken soup really does help with colds. The study also analyzed various commercially available canned soups (though it should be noted “No strict quality control was performed, although each preparation was evaluated by taste and was felt to be satisfactory (if variably so).”

They found that chemicals present in all of the soups (Grandma’s Soup, as well as the 13 brands purchased at local grocery stores) inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis.

It is also worth noting that the control group was neutral: “Omaha tap water had no activity.”

Disclaimer: There’s a small chance that this article was written because the study made me go “aww” multiple times. But! On to other sources…

Another study compared the ingestion of hot water, hot soup, and cold water when you have a stuffed up or runny nose. The hot water and the soup both had an affect, as the water vapor (steam) inhaled while consuming them helped decongest for about 30 minutes. The soup had a more pronounced effect than the hot water, however–the researchers theorized that there was a physical reaction to the presence of flavor (which also explains why tea can be useful).

Now that I’ve convinced you, onto the recipes!

I think “Grandma’s Soup” is a pretty good starter recipe, so here’s some less conventional ones:

whitechickenchili

crockpot-chicken-wild-rice-soup-3

Spicy Italian Chicken Noodle Soup 1 012edited

pho

 

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With Great Freedom Comes Great Responsibility: The Safety of Sugar Free

I like to think that I eat fairly healthily, especially compared to the norm. I try to keep my carbohydrates low, eat plenty of vegetables, and always have a bottle of water handy.

There is one questionable substance I allow myself without restriction, however: sucralose. I’ve realized this lately, and am attempting to cut down, but it’s made me curious about just how dangerous fake sweeteners are.

Most Americans and Europeans regularly consume “fake” sweeteners on a regular basis, either on purpose (in baking, coffee and tea) or unintentionally (in reduced fat foods, and even some medications). They’re a welcomed loophole for those looking to lose or maintain their weight, and keep their blood sugar stable. But are they safe?

It Causes Cancer! … It Might Cause Cancer! … Male Lab Rats Are Prone to Cancer!

It seems that the best argument those who oppose sweeteners have is that aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose are all carcinogenic–they cause cancer. But do they really?

The newest study to come to light was in June of 2013, when Italian scientist Dr. Morando Soffritti fed male lab rats “varying” levels of sucralose throughout their lives. This study is still under peer review, and has caused quite a bit of controversy in the scientific community.(1) It contradicts the 2000 study which concluded that the substance posed no threat. Both studies were carried out on lab rats over a significant portion of their life span.

The scientific community, so far, is disregarding this study as “bad science,” however. Read the full story here. It seems that this Dr. Soffritti has been under review by his peers for less than perfect performance in the past, so for now, the consensus is that sucralose is safe for consumption.

splenda

This is only the most recent of many almost identical situations for artificial sweeteners. In the 1970s, the oldest sweetener, saccharin, came under fire when scientists found that lab rats fed the substance developed bladder tumors. Upon further investigation, it was discovered that the specific way rodents metabolized saccharin was causing the problem, and that humans would not suffer the same consequences. Warning labels were removed from Sweet’n’Low and Sugar Twin by 2000.

Conversely to the accusatory studies, University of Adelaide researchers released findings that shows that the gut’s reaction to sweetener is neutral. “In our most recent study involving healthy men, we found that the gut’s response to artificially sweetened drinks was neutral – it was no different to drinking a glass of water,” the researcher added. (2)

What About Natural No-Calorie or Low-Calorie Sweeteners?

When you think of “natural low calorie sweetener,” how many of you think of Stevia? Oh, looks like most of you.

Unfortunately, it looks like Stevia is actually worse for you than any chemical sweetener–though nobody is going to drop from this chemical. The compounds in this shrub, which has been consumed for centuries, break down in humans’ guts to steviol, which is slightly toxic. Dr. Berger explains this much better than I could:

Erythritol, however, seems to be the one golden angel of the bunch. This chemical has never been accused of being harmful–in fact, it’s only fault is being a sugar alcohol. No, it doesn’t get you drunk; being a sugar alcohol means that a fair amount of the population (about 40%) will get a blood sugar spike from consuming it, though smaller than if they were consuming regular sugar. Also, all sugar alcohols (xylitol, maltitol, and sorbitol are some of the more common ones) cause many consumers intestinal discomfort, so make sure you keep track of how much you eat in one serving, and per day, or you may be in for a bad time.

stevia

 

So What Am I To Nom?

Because artificial sweeteners are still under review, it’s hard to say what the future brings. However, at this time, it looks like all commercially available low or no calorie sweeteners are safe for consumption–in moderation. Keep track of how much you eat a day, and take note of any weird symptoms or discomfort. Your body will tell you what’s best!

 

What sweetener do you use?

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The Ultimate Guide to Cooking Oils

Cooking oil is a ubiquitous pantry item, no matter what your diet–high-fat, low-fat, vegan, and paleo eaters all need it. This isn’t a bad thing, as fat is vital to the proper functioning of the body. However, unlike in the days of your grandmother, when there was butter, olive oil, canola oil, and maybe one other fancy shmancy oil for special dressings, the modern grocery shopper has their choice of a dizzying array of liquid lipids.

First, a Handy Dandy Chart

I’m giving full credit to theconsciouslife.com for this chart. It’s fantastic and I immediately recognized that I could not do better at this time.

Screen Shot 2013-12-16 at 7.42.11 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-16 at 7.41.59 PM chart of cooking oilsLegend:
SFA: Saturated fatty acids
MUFA: Monounsaturated fatty acids
PUFA: Polyunsaturated fatty acids
Ω-3: Omega-3 fatty acids
Ω-6: Omega-6 fatty acids
Ω-9: Omega-9 fatty acids
Ω-6:3 Ratio: Omega-6 to omega-3 ratio
Smoke Point: The temperature at which a cooking oil starts to burn and produce chemicals that are potentially harmful.

 

What Does It All Mean?

The Omegas

Science tells us that no matter what your budget, or how delicious butter is, it’s really important to balance your omega-3 and omega-6s. What are these silly things? They’re essential polyunsaturated fatty acids, and are crucial for proper brain and body function.

Though omega-6 is necessary for a brain function, hair and skin growth, bone health, regulation of the metabolism, and maintenance of the reproductive system, too much can cause inflammation. Most Westernized eaters consume far too much, which leaving out it’s counterpart, omega-3 (which cuts down on inflammation). This lack of balance has been been blamed for a host of common 1st world diseases, from dementia to Complete Regional Pain Syndrome.

Omega 9, the fairly new kid on the health awareness block, is equally important for hearth health and blood sugar control. This omega is also likely to increase your metabolism with consumption, and improve your moods. It’s most likely found hanging out in canola oil, nuts, and avocados.

Screen Shot 2013-12-16 at 8.03.01 PMfrom goodfats101.com

The bottom line: you’re probably getting enough omega-6, so it’s a good idea to focus on getting more omega-3 and omega-9. 

Smoking Point

When an oil starts to smoke, it means that it’s breaking down. What that means for you, as a chef, is that if it gets any hotter, your food is not going to taste very good, and you’ll some of the health benefits from your dish. Lastly, the blueish smoke you see rising from your dish is made up of acrolein, which can really do a number on your eyes and throat. If your pan starts smoking, turn off the fire, turn on a fan or open a window, and give it some space to cool down.

In general, for high heat operations, such as sauteeing, deep frying, or grilling, you’ll want to use vegetable oils. The main exception to this rule is hydrogenated vegetable shortening. The only animal fat that is suitable for this kind of operation is ghee, or clarified butter.

Lower smoke point oils, such as coconut and oil, are great for everything from coatings to salad dressings. Their more pronounced flavors will lend that special flare to your dish, without you having to worry about losing them to the heat of cooking.

Flaming_wok_by_KellyB_in_Bountiful,_Utah

What oil is your favorite to use? Do you have any unique oils in your pantry?

 

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The Facts About Migraines

I suffer migraines often, as does over 13% of the American population. They’re classed as one of the most disabling chronic illnesses, with more than 90% of sufferers claiming that they miss school or work when experiencing one.

“Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer”

Given that these attacks have plagued me since I hit puberty, I figured I should educate myself on them–hopefully you learn a few things as well!

What Causes Them?

What’s Going On In My Head?

It’s always good to give bad news first, right? Well, the bad news is that nobody is really sure what causes them. There are two popular theories:

  • Changes in the brainstem that affect how it interacts with the trigeminal nerve, which is one of the most crucial pain pathways.
  • Chemical or hormonal imbalances, especially in seratonin. This theory is supported by the fact that levels of this hormone are very low during attacks–though that may be an because of the pain, not the original cause of it. (1)
  • An incomplete or unusual network of arteries supplying the brain. (2)

What is known is what the mechanical affect is. During a migraine, the temporal artery (the one that runs across your temple), one of the major arteries for your head, enlarges. This causes a rush of chemicals that trigger inflammation, pain, and–in an evolutionary fluke–further enlargement of the artery.

Are My Symptoms Normal?

These hormones cause a variety of symptoms. Migraines are characterized by:

  • Extreme, aching pain that seems to originate from the temples and radiate around the head.
  • Decreased blood pressure, which causes cold hands and feet.
  • Sensitivity to light and sounds. You probably want to be somewhere dark and quiet, even though it doesn’t make you feel better.
  • Intestinal distress, such as vomiting, diarrhea, and general discomfort.

Triggers and Warnings

What’s more important for sufferers to know–more than the mechanical reason for them–is what their particular trigger or triggers are. Some of the most common ones…

Specific foods

Tyramine or phenylethylamine

“Say what?”

These two amino acids are found most abundantly in chocolate, aged or fermented cheeses such as Brie, cheddar, and “moldy” varieties, citrus fruits, vinegar, nuts, and soy products. (3) Since that most likely eliminates many of your favorite foods, make sure to document what you ate right before your migraine started so you can narrow the list down.

If this is true for you, be careful of eating leftovers. Tyramine content increases over time, so try to only store foods that don’t have to be in air tight containers, and be wary of situations where food has been left out for a while, such as parties and office snacks.

Lastly, many alcoholic beverages, such as beer, red wine, sherry, and vermouth contain copious amounts of the chemical, so try to find alternate adult beverages for partying without the pain. More on boozing further down!

Caffeine

Coffee, tea, energy drinks, and even some dark chocolates can start the aching for some.

Alcohol and Dehydration

These two belong together, as boozing is one of the few times where the more you empty your cup, the most dehydrated you are. Alcohol itself may be your trigger, but before you convict this culprit, try alternating alcoholic beverages with tall glasses of water.

Tannins

Tea, red wine, and red fruit (apples, pears, and grapes all qualify) and their juices can all cause migraines. If you frequently suffer after consuming red or purple foods or beverages, this may be your prime suspect.

Preservatives

Nitrites, nitrates, and sulfites have all been guilty of causing migraines. These chemicals are doing your body no favors. Be wary of hot dogs, deli meats, dried fruit, and, one more time, wine.

Aspartame

That cute little pink envelope by the coffee doesn’t look so friendly when you suffer from migraines. Check labels when you chose to drink diet beverages, light yogurts, or anything labelled “sugar free” that still tastes sweet.

Menstruation

As if you need another reason to hate these days of the month.

Your Surroundings

Strong perfumes, flickering lights, and excessive stress can all be triggers.

It’s important to keep a diary of when you get migraines, and narrow down what causes them. This will help you avoid them in the future. The triggers listed are only the most common, you may have something else to blame, such as medication or certain physical activities. 

Relief

You probably started reading this article to find out how to treat the stupid things, right? Well, here it is…

Prevention

The best way to treat migraines is to prevent them as often as you can. Find out what your triggers are, and avoid them! Even if it’s chocolate–it’s really just not worth the pain.

If your migraines are particularly severe, often, or both, talk to your doctor. They may prescribe preventative medicines, such as:

  • Cardiovascular drugs such as beta blockers or calcium channel blockers.
  •  Tricyclic antidepressants or selective seratonin reuptake inhibitors, as they can help regulate your seratonin.
  • Anti-seizure drugs such as Depacon and Topamax have been shown to reduce the frequency of migraines. These drugs have some serious side effects, so it’s recommended you only take them if you absolutely must.
  • Botox injections in the muscles of the head and neck have been shown to help lessen the effect and frequency.
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs such as naproxen may help.

Treatment During an Attack

If you can take pain medications right when you’re feeling the beginnings of a migraine, they’re more likely to work. NSAIDS (Advil, Motrin IB) are hit or miss. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) helps some but is less likely.

Drugs marketed as specifically for migraines, such as Excedrin Migraine (this one is my personal favorite), help for mild to medium severity attacks, but don’t do much if you wait to take them.

All of these medications lead to stomach complications if taken too often.

If these don’t work for you, or you have migraines more than once a month, talk to your doctor about:

  • Triptans, which constrict blood vessels, have been proven to help end migraines sooner, and manage pain. There’s several side effects, however, and they are not recommended to those who are at risk for stroke or heart attack–if you have high blood pressure, don’t take these.
  • Dihydroergotamine (Migranal) is an ergotamine derivative with less side affects. It’s available as either a nasal spray or injection.
  • Opioids should only be taken as a last resort, as they’re fairly addictive. They can be helpful for those who cannot take triptans or ergot.(4)

If you can sleep, do. It’s one of the best ways to cure a migraine that doesn’t come in pill form.

Do you have any tips, tricks, or anecdotes you’d like to share about your migraines?

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Healthy Holiday Potluck Recipes

Thanksgiving just scooted by, Christmas is just around the corner, and it seems like every weekend is another holiday party! In honor of it being Friday (you probably are going to something festive tomorrow, right?) I’ve made a list of delicious, healthy potluck items to bring to wow your friends and your trainer.

“It Only Took You 10 Minutes? Liar!” (Easy)

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“Oh My, You Didn’t Have To Do All That!”(Medium)

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“You Know, Not Everything Is A Competition…” (Hard)

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Do you have a favorite I’ve forgotten? Let me know in the comments!

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The Big Four

Want to lose weight? Control your acne? Improve mental clarity?

These four diets are what I believe to be the “extremes,” with most other (safe and healthy) eating plans being a combination of qualities from them. They each have unique pros and cons, which I’ve listed in each description.

For any diet, it’s important that calories are kept within a reasonable limit, and that you do what feels right for your body.

Let’s start out with the majority of readers’ “ground zero”…

Western Pattern, Meat-Sweet, or the Standard American Diet (SAD)

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This way of eating has overtaken the majority of Westerners, and is spreading through the world as each new fast food chain is opened. Most calories are taken in through red meat, sugary desserts, and refined grains, along with high fat foods. A large amount of dairy is typically added, along with highly sugared beverages and processed animal products.

The macronutrient breakdown is generally about 50% carbohydrates, 15% protein, and 35% fat–which, if eaten through different foods, could make up a healthy intake, but the concerning aspect of this way of eating lies more with the overly processed nature of the foods. (1)

Pros: Easy to maintain as it fits with cultural habits, generally inexpensive, low prep time per meal.

Cons: Difficult to maintain control over calories as the high glycemic load of this diet induces cravings and blood sugar variances in most adults. 

Now on to the good stuff…

The Paleolithic Diet

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get the recipe

This diet is based off of the idea that if it can’t be found in nature, don’t eat it if a human wouldn’t eat it before the agricultural revolution, it’s not food (thanks Mike D for correcting me!). Because of that guideline, those who follow a Paleolithic–usually shortened to just “paleo”–diet plan eat plenty of meats, vegetables, fruits, and tubers, while scorning dairy, grains and processed foods (from wheat to bologna). This diet’s macros are highly variable, and depend on what the eater prefers.

If using this diet for weight loss, or to treat diabetes, it’s a good idea to go light on the fruits and tubers, and eat mostly meats and vegetables. If this diet is adopted as a possible remedy for various maladies such as acne, frequent headaches, and hormonal imbalances(2)–many of which are theorized to be caused by various allergies, excessive sodium intake, gluten, unnatural chemicals in food, or high blood sugar–the dieter should experiment with macronutrient amount and timing to achieve their desired result.

Pros: Is reported to help treat many diseases, allergies, and, depending on your choice of food, can assist with weight loss. 

Cons: Can be moderately difficult to maintain in social settings. Because grass fed meats and dairy, and organic produce are highly recommended, this diet can be expensive to maintain. 

For more information: The Beginner’s Guide, What To Eat On The Paleo Diet, The Paleo SubReddit

Ketogenic Diet

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get the recipe

This diet, often simply referred to as “keto,” has a similar menu to the Paleo diet, but for different reasons. Originally used to treat some forms of child epilepsy, this way of eating was popularized for weight loss by Dr. Atkins. The keto diet as we know it today maintains the recommended maximum of 30 grams of carbohydrates a day–shared by both the medical diet and the Atkins diet–as well as a defined macro recommendation that the daily calorie breakdown should be 30% protein, 65% fat, and 5% or less carbohydrates (remember that fats are 9 calories per gram, whereas protein and carbohydrates are 4 calories per gram).

This diet consists almost entirely of leafy green vegetables, fatty cuts of meat, eggs, hard cheeses, and small amounts of nuts and berries. Because of the diuretic effect of this plan, users should be careful to both drink plenty of water, and ensure that they are consuming enough electrolytes (sodium, potassium, magnesium).

Unlike many other diets, this plan must be adhered to diligently to get results–dieters will not get nearly the same benefits by partially adhering, either by only following the “rules” some days of the week, or by not cutting carbohydrates out enough. Do not be mistaken, there is benefit to lowering carbohydrates, but the dramatic results that are associated with keto–improved mental clarity, acne cessation, hunger suppression, and rapid weight loss for those with 30+ pounds of extra fat–will not take effect until the body enters ketosis, as this diet’s success relies on hormone and energy regulation, and has a chemical impact on the functioning of your body:

Ketosis is a state in which your body has run out of glycogen (sugar), and is using fat for energy, including your brain. This can take anywhere from 3-10 days to achieve, during which many experience the “keto flu,” a state in which the body is adjusting to the new energy source. The dieter will feel sluggish and dim, and possibly experience headaches and mild nausea. Once the body is adjusted, however, dieters report feeling “smarter,” more alert, free of cravings and severe hunger pangs, and even (in some, not all) needing to sleep less hours every night.

Pros: Can remedy many maladies caused by high blood sugar and gluten. Is very helpful for those suffering from diabetes, or are pre-diabetic. Regulates hunger and greatly diminishes cravings. Some evidence that the diet “starves” cancerous growths. (3)

Cons: Can be very difficult to maintain in social settings. Many, including some doctors, combat the diet openly, as there is a belief that fat and red meat will lead to cancer, high cholesterol, and heart disease–though keto dieters tend to have improved blood panels after a few months. 

For more information: The Keto Calculator, Diet 911 by Muscle & Fitness, The Keto SubReddit

Vegetarian

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get the recipe

The majority of vegetarian dieters are lacto-ovovegetarian, in that they do not eat animal products, save for eggs, dairy, and honey. (4) Fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes are all encouraged.

Those who are looking to lose weight should be mindful of their grain intake, as calories can accumulate, though it can be tempting to turn to breads and pastas out of convenience. Dieters should also be mindful of their protein intake, and ensure that they are eating plenty of beans, dairy, eggs, and nuts. The healthfulness of eating excessive amounts of soy is still under debate, though some–especially men–have reported ill effects.

This diet can be extremely nutritious if the dieter primarily eats vegetables and fruits. It’s easy to have a wide variety of tastes, as many are culturally vegetarian.

Pro: Easy to maintain in a social setting. Wide variety of foods available.

Cons: Some foods that qualify as vegetarian are low in nutritional value, so a high level of self control is necessary for maintaining or losing weight. 

For more information: Becoming Vegetarian, Vegetarian Times

Vegan

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get the recipe

Like vegetarians, vegans do not eat animal products–and also do not eat eggs, dairy, or honey, which can make it a little bit harder for them to get adequate protein. With the right planning, this diet can be just as complete as any other, though the same precautions against excessive refined carbohydrates (namely bread and pasta) should be taken as with vegetarians.

Because of the extensive restrictions on food that can be eaten, it’s highly recommended that those considering adopting this lifestyle plan out how they will eat to ensure that they get enough fat, protein, and minerals.

Veganism has been reported to have many health benefits, often in ways unique to the particular dieter, and can include allergy and asthma relief. If done right, the food a vegan consumes is much lower in calories than the same volume of non-vegan food, and can be a very effective diet for weight loss. (5)

Pros: Is reported to help alleviate hypertension, obesity, and may play a part in preventing cancer. (6If the dieter avoids processed grains, the food is generally very low in calories, and thus conducive to weight loss. 

Cons: Can be very difficult to maintain in a social setting, as many dishes include non-vegan ingredients, such as butter while cooking. 

For more information: 10 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Went Vegan, How to Be a Vegan and Stay Healthy

How do you like to eat? What makes you feel best? Have you tried any of these?

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Iliotibial Band Syndrome

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What’s an IT Band?

You have an iliotibial, or IT band that runs down the outside of each of your legs. This unique ligament serves to move your legs (extending, abducting, and rotating your hip), and runs from your hip to just below your knee. It connects to many of the muscles in your upper legs, including the quadriceps (front thigh), glutei (booty), and hamstrings (back of thigh). It’s also connected to the fascia of your upper leg, which is the tough “gristle” that holds all of your muscles in place.

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Because of it’s location, the IT band is easy to injury with repetitive movement. Running, biking, and even long walks can irritate it if the exerciser’s form is incorrect, putting undue pressure on the bursa sack, which enflames the small pouch. This causes the ITB to meet resistance while moving over the femur, instead of gliding.

Do I Have IT Band Friction Syndrome?

If you’re having lateral knee pain, you may have ITBFS/ITBS.

Signs and symptoms:

  1. Pain on the lateral (outside) side of the upper leg and knee joint.
  2. Snapping or popping sensations around the knee.
  3. Swelling around the lower thigh and knee.
  4. In advanced cases, a radiating pain from the knee up to the hip.

If you think you have ITBS, it’s best to see your physician. Because of how the brain discriminates various areas of the knee, pain can seem to come from an area that is close by, but isn’t exactly where the injury is. A doctor will be able to better judge the cause of the irritation.

If for some reason cannot see a physician, a self test you can perform is:

  1. Sit with legs bent.
  2. With your fingers, press on the outside of the knee in question, just over where you can feel the bone of your kneecap. When you move your knee, you should be able to feel the tendon gliding along.
  3. While putting pressure over the tendon, straighten your leg. Once your leg is at twenty to thirty degrees, your ITB will pass over the bone–if you have ITBFS you will have a sharp pain as it does so.

However, this test is not fool proof. The iliotibial band runs the entire length of your leg, which means that irritation may be at the hip as well as the knee. Further, your thigh is one of the most complicated parts of your body, and the pain may be caused by another malady. The proper procedure with any pain is to rest it. Stretching can be performed as long as it does not worsen the pain. If you feel that you may have a stress fracture or more severe injury, please consult a physician.

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Causes of IT Band Syndrome

ITBS is caused when, essentially, an exercise that mimics the squatting position is performed in a way that lengthens the IT band. This can be caused by improper form, anatomical variances, muscle and flexibility imbalances, or a combination of all.

Anatomical variances, especially leg length discrepancies, can cause one leg to develop a tight IT band as it must slope inward slightly to allow the shorter leg to land.

Runners typically develop the syndrome when they run on the same side of the same road repeatedly during training. Most roads have a slight angle to them, either banked or canted, to channel water–this can cause the legs to overcompensate and has the same effect as leg length discrepancies, since the pelvis is continuously tilted.

Excessive hill running can also be a cause of ITBS, especially if an intense regimen is started without build up.

Bicyclists often develop ITBS as a result of either pedaling with bowed legs, or with a “toe in” form. Both of these variances can cause the IT band to become irritated–it’s best to bike with knees parallel to the center bar and each other.

How to Treat ITBFS/ITBS

Prevention:

Strengthening the muscles of the leg and hips will allow better stabilization of the limb, which will fend off ITBS, as well as other injuries. Even if you prefer a certain kind of sport, especially running and bicycling, make sure that you cross train at least 20% of your workouts.

A thorough stretching regimen, including both active and static stretches, will prevent many injuries. However, if you currently do not stretch, make sure to add various movements slowly, and never stretch to the point of pain.

Treatment:

If you have ITBS, or suspect you do, the first course of action is that of inaction–rest!

Your ligament is enflamed, which puts your knee at risk. Generally speaking, this is a matter of form, as mentioned earlier. Do not repeat the offending exercise for 1-6 weeks, or until you can climb stairs without experiencing pain. During this time, make sure to stretch the injured limb gently, progressing as it heals. If you can manage to get a sports massage, do.

Some common stretches and exercises for ITBS (from RunnersWorld.com):

Stretch #1: Pull foot up to back of buttocks. Cross the uninjured leg over the injured leg and push down, hold for 30 seconds.
Stretch #2: Cross injured leg behind and lean towards the uninjured side. This stretch is best performed with arms over the head, creating a “bow” from ankle to hand on the injured side (unlike how it is depicted).
Stretch # 3: Cross injured leg over the uninjured side and pull the leg as close to your chest as possible.

Foam Roller
Roll your injured leg over the foam roller, add more time gradually each day to help mobilize your tissues and break up scar tissue.

 

Single Leg Balance and Strengthening
May start just balancing on one foot when brushing your teeth. Gradually you can add challenges such as using a soccer ball and moving the ball in different directions. Another good method is to balance on one foot and play catch with yourself with a tennis ball against a wall or dribble a basketball. Start out with one minute at a time, and build up to 3-5 minutes.

 

Side Leg Lifts
Keep the back of the leg and buttocks against the wall. Slide the leg up the wall and hold at the top for 5 seconds then slide back down. Point toes down.

Start with one set of 20 each leg, after 1 week add a second set of 5. Every 2 days add 5 more as long as it is being well tolerated until you build up to 3 sets of 20 lifts.

 

Strengthening with Theraband
Loop one end and close in the door. Loop other end around the uninjured leg. Bend your knee on the injured leg and balance on the injured leg. Put your uninjured leg through a range of running motion, going up and back. Build up to 3-5 minutes, make sure to exercise both legs.

 

If these stretches are not helpful and pain persists or worsens over time, consult your doctor, as the injury may require professional treatment, or could be caused by another injury, such as a stress fracture.

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